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2020 was a year of many challenges — and a rise in security breaches was one of them. After all, criminals are usually the ones to exploit the vulnerabilities of others. Both huge companies and individual users have suffered from devastating cyberattacks.

The main trend of the year is ransomware. Every week the companies reported being blackmailed by hackers after their files and systems had been encrypted, paralyzed or stolen. The organizations that fell prey to the 11 biggest ransomware attacks have spent $144.2 million on the investigation, system repair, ransom and implementing new protective solutions.

The amount of compromised accounts is striking. Only one hacker group called Shiny Hunters have published hundreds of millions of breached accounts for open access. And every one of them can become a gateway to more attacks. …


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Greetings!

While you are looking for gifts for your loved ones, we have prepared a gift for you!
We present you a limited-time* Christmas offer with a special price that will provide a discount of 10% for each email placed on the Breach Report monitoring.

Happy Holidays!

Sincerely,
Breach Report Team

*The offer is valid for contracts signed from 10th December 2020 to 20th January 2021. A discount price will cover 3 months since the date of an official agreement.


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On December 1, 2020, the Bitcoin has set a new record high of $19,906. But the cryptocurrency market is not all roses. These new means of payment were created to protect the anonymity of the deals. But in reality, they are not always safe. Cryptocurrency exchanges get hacked, and the holders of the funds get scammed on the regular basis. And of course, the anonymity of cryptocurrencies is getting abused by the dealers of illegal goods on the dark web.

In October 2020, the U.S. Attorney General presented a new report by the Cyber-Digital Taskforce called “Cryptocurrency: An Enforcement Framework”. The report lists the threats, such as buying and selling tools to commit crimes or to support terrorism, ransom, blackmail, and extortion, money laundering, operating unlicensed or non-compliant exchanges, evading taxes, theft, fraud and cryptojacking (malicious use of someone’s computing power to mine cryptocurrencies). The guide also explains the regulatory approaches to these kinds of crimes, current challenges and future strategies for the enforcement bodies. …


We can never repeat too often how important it is to use strong and unique passwords and two-factor authentication these days. Cyber-attacks occur literally every minute and no one is safe… even the President of the United States!

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On October 16, 2020, a Dutch ethical hacker Victor Gevers figured out the password to Donald Trump’s Twitter account. Gevers says that the two-factor authentication (2FA) was turned off and the password was as easy as “maga2020!” (“maga” stands for the Trump campaign’s slogan “Make America Great Again”). The hacker published the following tweet on behalf of the President:


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The new coronavirus pandemic has brought a lot of unfortunate changes to our lives, including the spike in cybercrime. The feelings of uncertainty and anxiety made people more vulnerable to social engineering attacks, especially phishing. As the result, lots of financial and sensitive data was compromised.

Cybersecurity experts assessed how serious this upsurge is. According to the evaluation of Breach Report team, the number of dark web data dumps in the second quarter of 2020 was 4 times bigger than in the first quarter of this year, and 2.5 times bigger versus the second quarter of 2019. 60% of all leaks occurred in April, the peak of the first wave of the pandemic. The surge or remote work without the use of secure corporate networks contributed to the problem. …


Recent large-scale attacks on millions of websites show how important it is to continuously implement protective measures, such as security patch updates. We’ve also put together some more recommendations on incident prevention and recovery both for businesses and individual users.

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Site management platforms under siege

In September, millions of website owners were attacked by cybercriminals. The first series of attacks were exploiting the vulnerability in the file manager plug-in of WordPress. Even though the developer promptly released the patch, a huge number of site owners are still running the flawed version of the plug-in.

And since September 11th, hackers targeted thousands of websites that use the e-commerce platform Magento. The campaign was a typical attack by the Magecart hacker group, according to Willem de Groot, the founder of Sanguine Security. The malicious code was injected in the stores to steal the payment card data of their customers. A total of 2806 websites was compromised. The majority of them were running the outdated Magento 1.x version, which isn’t being supported by Adobe since June 30, 2020. …


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The number of web apps offered online grows every year and their user base tends to increase as well. So it’s no wonder that cybercriminals are frequently targeting them. According to the Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report 2020, “attacks on web apps were a part of 43% of breaches, more than double the results from last year. As workflows move to cloud services, it makes sense for attackers to follow. …


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The attacker has already started to sell 8,225 databases with, allegedly, 15 billion user records on the darknet marketplace called Empire. The Breach Report team investigated the incident and came up with some new evidence-based conclusions.

What happened

A cybercriminal with the handle NightLion claims to have breached the data leak monitoring and indexing service called Data Viper, owned by the internet security firm Night Lion Security. Data Viper spokesperson denies this fact and claims that the hacker obtained a small amount of data from their development server. …


Data leaks can be very dangerous. Compromised records may allow cybercriminals to steal valuable assets such as intellectual property, financial resources, or extort multi-million ransom. Unfortunately, the last couple of weeks were eventful in terms of resonant cyberattacks. Several IT giants suffered serious data breaches.

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Intel leak

For example, 20 Gb of confidential documents belonging to Intel were leaked last week. A Swiss software engineer Tillie Kottmann published the data after receiving it from an anonymous hacker. The compromised information includes technical specs, product source code, and internal documents on different CPUs and chipsets. …


Breach Report team decided to check 81 antivirus companies in the database of 14,5 billion breached records.

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Domain names of only 6 companies out of 81 (7,4%) appear to have never been leaked. More than 73,000 corporate emails belonging to 75 of them have been compromised. The breached data includes more than 157,000 passwords, including 47,000 plain text ones, almost 1,000 credit card records and lots of other personal data.

About

TheBreachReport

We report public leaks of security breaches.

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